Captive Portal Automated Testing

wifi_captive_portalIf you’ve ever been to a coffee shop for free WiFi, and needed to sign-in for Internet access, you’ve used a Captive Portal. Are you developing one? How many stations can your portal controller authenticate simultaneously? Let’s do some automated testing of that with LANforge. This cookbook will guide you through how to use the portal-bot script.
#wifi #network #testing

LANforge 5.3.1 Released with WiFi Testing Emphasis

LANforge 5.3.1 has been a serious piece of work to put out. We were dogged by lots of troubles with the QCA firmware for the 802.11ac chipset. Ben put in countless hours combing through stack traces and kernel archives looking for fixes to DMA errors. Amazingly he fixed so many we are able to keep Layer-3 connections alive indefinitely now.

This was also an interesting development period because we got our first pair of Octobox anechoic chambers. These are RF-isolating boxes with RF impeding power and network interfaces at their margins. This was the first time we saw ideal 802.11n throughput in 5Ghz. Like…theoretical ideal. Checked off the list. Ben picked his jaw up off the floor when he saw Isaac’s graphs. Asked him to “do that again!”

Jed spent much time doing 802.11x station roaming experiments. The trick to roaming effectively is to shuffle the roaming requests between radios, not to send sequential roaming (stampeding) requests from a single radio. It would make sense from a CSMCA point of view that a WiFi environment wants to actively listen for activity instead of constantly broadcast. Jed was able to get 30 wifi roaming events a second between two LANforge CT523’s running 164 virtual stations.

This lead us to a great LANforge 5.3.1 release. Lot of work. More planned. Stay tuned.